News Mar 20: R.U.B.E v1.7 released. Instanciable objects!
Feb 21: Added RUBE sample loader for Cocos2d-X v3.4.
Feb 17: Funny Fists released in iOS App store and Google Play store. (YouTube video)
2014
May 25: R.U.B.E v1.6 released. Samplers!
May 12: "On-the-fly" resource updating for Cocos2d-x
Apr 22: New blog post: Inverted pendulum control
Apr 7: On-screen logging class for Cocos2d-x
Mar 22: Downhill Supreme 2 released for iOS and Android
Jan 2: YouTube video: Making soft-body wheels in RUBE
2013
Oct 6: Check out Supplyfront RTS, my 7dRTS entry continued.
Sep 26: R.U.B.E v1.5 released. Customizable item labels, snap-to-grid, export filtering, full-text help search.
Sep 18: Added RUBE sample loader for Cocos2d-X.
Sep 16: Updated RUBE sample loader for Cocos2d v2.
Aug 12: RUBE loader for Nape by Zeh Fernando
Aug 7: Added RUBE sample loader for SFML.
Jul 30: Try my MiniLD 7dRTS entry.
Jul 24: Added physics-driven particles tutorial.
Jul 20: New blog post: rendering solid ground (as in Downhill Supreme)
Jul 18: R.U.B.E v1.4 released. Command-line interface for batch jobs, hotkeys for scripts, better script management.
May 22: Downhill Supreme is out now! (iOS)
Apr 2: R.U.B.E v1.3 released. Collision bitplane editing, Cocos2d-iphone loader, usability improvements.
Mar 11: R.U.B.E v1.2 released. Now supports weld, friction, motor joints and automatic image reloading.
Mar 10: RUBE loader for libGDX by Tim Scott
Jan 28: New blog post: a functional combustion engine!
Jan 22: New blog post: wind tunnel
Jan 20: Added explosions tutorial.
Jan 16: Added buoyancy tutorial.
Jan 16: AndEngine sample project to load RUBE scene by Bart Hirst
Jan 14: R.U.B.E v1.1 released, now supports custom properties.
Jan 1: All basic tutorials are now available in Chinese at ohcoder.com Huge thankyou to @OhCoder!
2012
Dec 23: Discussion forums have been set up
Dec 4: R.U.B.E v1.0 is ready !
Dec 2: YouTube video: Box2D pendulum clock
Nov 26: New blog post: rocket platform thingy
Nov 25: Video of R.U.B.E scenes in Chipmunk.
Nov 23: A sample project to load R.U.B.E scenes into Chipmunk physics! Details here.
Nov 14: An XCode sample project to load R.U.B.E scenes on iOS is now available. Details here.
Nov 11: A Java version of b2dJson is now available, based on JBox2D.
Nov 6: A Javascript version of b2dJson based on box2dweb is now available. Demo here!
Nov 2: The full specification of the JSON format used by b2dJson can be found here: b2dJson file structure
Oct 28: YouTube video: 2-minute ragdoll in R.U.B.E Box2D editor
Sep 29: YouTube video: R.U.B.E Box2D editor usage example

Box2D C++ tutorials - Setting up (Linux)

Last edited: May 11 2017

Building the testbed (Linux)


Let's look at the process of setting up the default 'testbed' which is part of the Box2d source code base. The testbed is a very useful tool which contains examples of various features which you can interact with using the mouse, adjust parameters, pause and step the simulation etc.

Here I am using a fresh install of Fedora 14, so I might as well start right from the very beginning.

The simplest way to build the Box2D library is to use the cmake file which is included in the source code download. To do this you will need the cmake tool, and obviously a c++ compiler. For the testbed you will also need the developer libraries for GLUT and an input library for X windows. You can use yum to install all these in one go, like this:
yum install gcc-c++ cmake freeglut-devel libXi-devel

(Ubuntu)
sudo apt-get install g++ cmake libglu-dev libxi-dev
Download the Box2D source code archive from here. If you want to use the terminal all the way, you could also do this (if wget is not available, use yum to install it):
https://storage.googleapis.com/google-code-archive-downloads/v2/code.google.com/box2d/Box2D_v2.1.2.zip
Use the following commands to unzip and build it.
(Update: See also david's comment below for Ubuntu
unzip Box2D_v2.1.2.zip
cd Box2D_v2.1.2/Box2D/Build
cmake ..
make
After this you should see that some new folders have been created, one of which is 'Testbed' and this in turn contains an executable file called 'Testbed', so the app can be started like this:
cd Testbed
./Testbed
You should see the testbed window showing like this:
Testbed Select from the drop-down list in the top right to try out the tests that are currently in the testbed. We will be adding our own items into this list later on.

Testbed features


Apart from the obvious features visible in the right hand control panel, the testbed also allows you to:
  • Move the view around - arrow keys or drag with right mouse button
  • Zoom the view - z,x keys
  • Grab objects in the scene - left mouse button
  • Launch a bomb into the scene from a random location - space bar
  • Launch a bullet into the scene - drag left mouse button while holding shift, then let go
Depending on which test you view, you can sometimes use the keyboard to interact with the scene too. We will make use of the mouse and keyboard interactions in these tutorials.